Maryknoll Office for Global Concerns

Representing Maryknoll Fathers & Brothers, Maryknoll Sisters, and Maryknoll Lay Missioners
  • Sri Lanka children - Jim Stipe
  • Golden calf on Wall Street
  • Seedbag
  • Altar in Palestine - R Rodrick Beiler
  • corn bags

Social justice

Maryknoll missioners around the world feel the impact of social injustice and see its effects in the communities were they live and work. Flowing from their ministries of presence and accompaniment, as well as from the concrete programs and projects in which Maryknollers participate, we engage in the hard work of identifying root causes of social and economic injustice. With a particular focus on the geographical regions where Maryknoll is present, as well as on structural or systemic injustice affecting women, children, indigenous peoples, migrants and refugees and people with HIV and AIDS, we join with others of like mind to identify potential pathways to social transformation and to move our world in that direction.

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Articles, alerts, events

U.S. immigration: ‘We’re all human’

Darrin Mortenson, who serves as the migration fellow for the Maryknoll Office for Global Concerns, reports on his visit to El Paso, Texas, in July, where he met with some of the Maryknoll missioners who welcome and accompany newly-arrived migrants despite the rising risks and complicated political reality of the U.S.-Mexico “borderlands.” The following article was published in the September-October 2017 issue of NewsNotes.

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Scripture reflections

First Sunday of Advent

December 2, 2012

The first Sunday of Advent 2012 falls on the 32th anniversary of the martyrdom of the four North American churchwomen in El Salvador. This reflection is prepared by Marie Dennis, co-president of Pax Christi International and former director of the Maryknoll Office for Global Concerns.

30th Sunday in Ordinary time

October 28, 2012

Fr. Ken Thesing spent many years as a missioner in East Africa, and now works in Rome. "Our scriptures often use contrasts – like the theme of darkness and light, or as we see in the readings for today’s liturgy, the theme of 'blindness' and 'sight' to show that process of growth in understanding for the disciples or for anyone who wants to follow Jesus ... These are the people God brings back and restores – not just the strong, the gifted, and those who can pay for assistance but the frail and vulnerable – no one is left out."

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