Maryknoll Office for Global Concerns

Representing Maryknoll Fathers & Brothers, Maryknoll Sisters, and Maryknoll Lay Missioners
  • Golden calf on Wall Street
  • Sri Lanka children - Jim Stipe
  • Seedbag
  • corn bags
  • Altar in Palestine - R Rodrick Beiler

Economic justice

From Cambodia to El Salvador, Bangladesh to Tanzania, Maryknoll missioners accompany people and communities affected by poverty and extreme poverty. Based on our belief in the value of each human person and their right to a life of dignity, we work to eliminate the roots causes of poverty found in unjust economic structures. We promote the globalization of solidarity, the enhancement of inclusive human security and development that is rooted in social justice and ecological sustainability.

Read our statement Trading in justice: The local impact of global economic decisions.

We work for economic justice with an emphasis on the elimination of poverty and the empowerment of impoverished people. Our foci are globalization and its impact; trade and investment, especially the TRIPS agreement and its impact on the access to agricultural resources and affordable medicines; and the debt crisis, including illegitimate debt, the impact of macroeconomic reforms as a condition for debt relief, proposals for debt arbitration, the impact of corruption on debt cancellation and possible solutions. Other issues that we follow include food security and health care concerns in regards to trade and investment policies, and corporate accountability.

Learn more about our Faith-Economy-Ecology project.

Our newsletter, Encounters, features the challenges posed by the current economic growth paradigm and shines light on the hopeful ways communities are responding to protect human dignity and God's beautiful creation.

Read A Call to Integrate Faith, Ecology and the Global Economy, a statement of principles of more than 80 faith groups.

Ecological economics: A special series

As humanity faces the reality of exhausting a number of key natural resources, we realize that our economy, which is fundamentally built on the concept of never-ending exponential growth, must drastically change if we are going to live within the confines of a finite planet, Earth. This series of six articles, written by Dave Kane, looks at ecological economics and the idea of a steady state economy that will provide livelihoods while fitting within the footprint of Earth. The series was published in NewsNotes in 2009 and was updated in 2012.

Lake Coatepeque, El Salvador

El Salvador: A rare win against mining company

The government of El Salvador recently won a long-running legal battle when an international trade tribunal ruled that it did not have to pay compensation to a mining company that was denied a permit to drill for gold. El Salvador declared a moratorium on mining concessions in 2009, in an attempt to protect its water supply from being pollution, despite having previously signed international trade agreements.

Archbishop Silvano Tomasi: A vision of an inclusive economy in the age of Pope Francis and recurring financial crisis

Date: 
Nov 9, 2016
Location: 
Washington, D.C.

from Jubilee USA:

A Religious View Towards Building an Economic System that Protects the Vulnerable and Promotes Universal Prosperity

Address by Archbishop Silvano Tomasi

Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace, Former Permanent Observer of the Holy See to the United Nations 

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