Maryknoll Office for Global Concerns

Representing Maryknoll Fathers & Brothers, Maryknoll Sisters, and Maryknoll Lay Missioners
  • Golden calf on Wall Street
  • Sri Lanka children - Jim Stipe
  • Seedbag
  • corn bags
  • Altar in Palestine - R Rodrick Beiler

Economic justice

From Cambodia to El Salvador, Bangladesh to Tanzania, Maryknoll missioners accompany people and communities affected by poverty and extreme poverty. Based on our belief in the value of each human person and their right to a life of dignity, we work to eliminate the roots causes of poverty found in unjust economic structures. We promote the globalization of solidarity, the enhancement of inclusive human security and development that is rooted in social justice and ecological sustainability.

Read our statement Trading in justice: The local impact of global economic decisions.

We work for economic justice with an emphasis on the elimination of poverty and the empowerment of impoverished people. Our foci are globalization and its impact; trade and investment, especially the TRIPS agreement and its impact on the access to agricultural resources and affordable medicines; and the debt crisis, including illegitimate debt, the impact of macroeconomic reforms as a condition for debt relief, proposals for debt arbitration, the impact of corruption on debt cancellation and possible solutions. Other issues that we follow include food security and health care concerns in regards to trade and investment policies, and corporate accountability.

Learn more about our Faith-Economy-Ecology project.

Our newsletter, Encounters, features the challenges posed by the current economic growth paradigm and shines light on the hopeful ways communities are responding to protect human dignity and God's beautiful creation.

Read A Call to Integrate Faith, Ecology and the Global Economy, a statement of principles of more than 80 faith groups.

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Articles, alerts, events

Lake Coatepeque, El Salvador

El Salvador: A rare win against mining company

The government of El Salvador recently won a long-running legal battle when an international trade tribunal ruled that it did not have to pay compensation to a mining company that was denied a permit to drill for gold. El Salvador declared a moratorium on mining concessions in 2009, in an attempt to protect its water supply from being pollution, despite having previously signed international trade agreements.

Maryknoll Sister Elizabeth Knoerl (center) and Haitian women

Haiti: U.S. plans peanut dumping

A coalition of faith and development organizations, including the Maryknoll Office for Global Concerns, sent a letter to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) calling for the immediate cancellation of USDA’s planned shipment of 500 metric tons of U.S. peanuts to Haiti.

Trade: TPP negotiations end

On October 5, the U.S. and 11 other nations finalized negotiations on the biggest trade agreement in history: the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). Many concerns remain about the potential impact of this trade and investment deal on access to medicines and environmental standards.

Road to Paris: Trade deals must protect climate

As countries prepare for the climate negotiations in Paris in December, some experts have called attention to the need for including safeguards to protect nations’ actions to address climate change from legal challenges by trade partners. Without this legal protection, many of the initiatives to decrease climate emissions or to adapt to a changing environment could be overturned by lawsuits.

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Scripture reflections

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